Welcome!

How to Build Mobile Applications Easily and Cost-Effectively

Adam Blum

Subscribe to Adam Blum: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get Adam Blum via: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories by Adam Blum

Our open source framework Rhodes contains the first implementation of Ruby for every major smartphone operating system: iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and Symbian. The primary benefits of the Rhodes framework are: the productivity and portability enabled by writing interfaces in HTML once (and compiling to native smartphone apps), access to device capabilities from a common library used on all smartphone devices and the ability to easily incorporate synchronized data for offline use. But that said, we may have been underestimating the benefits that Ruby has for mobile development irrespective of the Rhodes framework which uses it. Ruby has compelling advantages for building smartphone apps that are worth describing in their own right: scripting language. Everything from implied (duck) typing to easier creation of classes and functions to built in suppor... (more)

Building iPhone Apps for Business

Friday I’m speaking at the Mobile 2.0 conference in Mountain View.   The topic is “iPhone for Business”, which, if I took the topic literally, raises many issues about distribution and maintenance of smartphones in the enterprise. But I’m really just going to focus on the narrower issue of “iPhone apps for business”: how do you build compelling and useful smartphone apps for enterprise information? This is informed primarily by my experience helping companies build smartphone apps for internal use using the Rhodes framework.  Most of these smartphone apps are internal company ap... (more)

“but isn’t HTML5 enough?” – why mobile usage will always be about native, not web, apps

I’m here at RailsConf 2010. What a great place to talk to current and prospective Rhodes developers! Rails developers all get why its important to have a full Model View Controller framework. They also get pretty excited about the presence of the first mobile Ruby on every smartphone device. Rails developers get the value of Rhodes deeper than any audience I’ve encountered. A couple of the other talks, from otherwise insightful web framework developers, who apparently have “smartphone envy”, were disturbing. One speaker talked about his efforts to make Rails a little better for ... (more)

UDDI as an Extended Web Services Registry

As enterprises build a critical mass of Web services, they need some way of keeping track of those services. UDDI is an ideal store for such information. Using UDDI's built-in abstractions of business services, binding templates, and tModels referring to interface specifications, UDDI can be used to manage all of the addresses and protocols and formats of those services. This information can be used for several purposes, including providing location independence and identification of common supported interfaces among those services. But the amount of information tracked on each W... (more)

Beyond Point to Point

Web services have emerged as an excellent method of integrating pairs of applications. Free and cheap Web services development tools from many different vendors make it easy to expose one application's capabilities to other applications that wish to invoke them. But, given recent trends and innovations in Web service standards for more complex integrations of multiple applications from many parties, integrating applications two-by-two with tightly coupled simple Web services may not be the best approach. In this article, I'll take a look at a reasonably complex integration scena... (more)